Google Chrome

Google Chrome Tip #6: Where’s the Status bar?

Google has really gone to great lengths to try to increase the viewing space in its Google Chrome browser such as moving the tabs into the window’s Title bar, etc. One thing that appears to be missing, though, is the Status bar at the bottom. So how do you see what URL you are hovering over? How do you know what URL is loading? The status bar is there on the lower right of the page, however it’s just not always there. Hover over any link, or load a page, and you will see the Status bar slid in. When you move off of a link or when the page finished loading, the Status bar slides away when not needed. Slick!

Google Chrome Tip #5: How to see Browsing History

Unlike in Firefox and Internet Explorer, Google Chrome has no dropdown integrated in the back and forward buttons, so how do you view your recent browsing history? Simple! Just click and hold either button, and if there is history, a dropdown menu will appear. You can alternately right-click on either arrow with the same effect. To view your full browsing history, select the “Show full history” selection from the same menu, select “History” from the “Customize and control Google Chrome” button (the “wrench” icon), or simply press and a full browsing history page will open in a new tab.

Google Chrome Tip #4: about:stuff

Enter about:memory into the Omni bar (the address bar) and Google Chrome will display a nice summary of your memory useage and all Google Chrome-related processes. As a bonus, the summary section also displays the memory usage information for all other open browsers giving you a nice comparison! Here is a list of other “about:” commands that provide interesting information and do some interesting things: about:cache about:crash about:dns about:hang about:histograms about:internets about:memory about:network about:plugins about:stats about:version Most of these can also be easily bookmarked by clicking the Star in the Omni bar.

Google Chrome Tip #3: Keyboard Shortcuts

Google provides many keyboard shortcuts to move around and work with Google Chrome. For a complete list, you can always jump over to the Google Chrome Keyboard Shortcuts page. In the mean time, read on to see a list of the keyboard shortcuts…. Here is a list of most of Google Chrome keyboard shortcuts: Window and tab shortcuts Window and tab shortcuts Ctrl+N Open a new window Ctrl+Shift+N Open a new window in incognito mode Press Ctrl, and click a link Open link in a new tab Press Shift, and click a link Open link in a new window Alt+F4 Close current window Ctrl+T Open a new tab Ctrl+Shift+T Reopen the last tab you’ve closed. Google Chrome remembers the last 10 tabs you’ve closed. Drag link to tab Open link in specified tab Drag link to space between tabs Open link in a new tab in the specified position on […]

Google Chrome Tip #2: Importing Firefox Portable Bookmarks

Currently, Google Chrome will only import Bookmarks from an installed version of Firefox. I use Firefox Portable exclusively, but unfortunately, Google Chrome does not recognize it as an import source. So, if you are a Firefox Portable user, here’s a quick and dirty method of getting all of your existing Firefox bookmarks into Google Chrome…. DISCLAIMER This process assumes that you are using the “Firefox Portable” application found at, and that you do not have Firefox “installed” on your PC. If you already have Firefox installed on your PC, doing this will probably mess up your current installation to the point that you may need to re-install Firefox and re-build all of your customizations. Be sure to back up your Firefox Portable directory because you don’t want to do anything to mess up your working version. I take no responsibility if you mess things up. Also, the specific directories […]

Google Chrome Tip #1: Enhanced Find Feature

This is a really subtle one, but Google Chrome improves nicely on the “find” function for finding text within an open page. As in other browsers, pressing <ctrl><f> brings up a find box, however its overall functionality is just a bit different. Read on to see the differences…. First, the find box is integrated unobtrusively in the upper right corner of the page into which you type your search text. It’s clean and looks good. I never liked how Internet Explorer pops up a dialog box. It just gets in the way. Firefox, Safari, and now Google Chrome implement this well with Google Chrome behaving similarly to how Safari does it. As you type your search text, hits are highlighted in real time and the number of occurrences is displayed in the box. Clicking the Up and Down arrows in the find box will step you through all occurrences highlighting […]